Stories Within Stories

Comment

Stories Within Stories

Every book we write contains funny stories, sad stories and unusual characters. These stories and people are the fabric of our lives, interwoven with our own histories, adding moments of joy, humour or tragedy to our everyday existence.

Comment

Mistletoe & Memories

Comment

Mistletoe & Memories

Christmas itself is often a source of rich and comforting memories. The sights, smells and sounds of Christmas evoke our childhood years more powerfully perhaps than anything else. 

Comment

The Family Firm

1 Comment

The Family Firm

Our books don’t always document the lives of individuals or families. Sometimes we’ll write and produce the story of a company. The ups and downs of a business can be just as intriguing as a life story. So, when Vivienne Metliss contacted us about writing the story of her family and her family’s furniture business we were delighted to help.

1 Comment

Look Back in Hunger

Comment

Look Back in Hunger

Dolly Mixtures, Sherbert Dip Dabs, Spangles, Walnut Whips, sticky toffee pudding, Grandma’s roast beef and Yorkshire pudding, rhubarb crumble, rice pudding, rabbit pie, Spam… What foods evoke days gone by for you?

Comment

A Fascinating Family History

Comment

A Fascinating Family History

Everyone has a book in them, so the adage goes. The challenge is to write it. David Small’s three children knew that both their father and mother had fascinating stories. Sadly, before the death of David’s wife, Annette, they had only shared the briefest of glimpses into the past. As David coped with the trials of getting older, Mary, Francis and John decided to act. If they didn’t capture their parents’ stories now, they could be lost forever.

Comment

Growing up Under Stalin & Hitler

Comment

Growing up Under Stalin & Hitler

At Book of My Life we believe that every life story is worth telling. It might not set the world on fire, but your story will provide a unique insight into the past nonetheless. It will be a precious slice of social history which will shine a light on years gone by.

But occasionally we meet someone whose story stops us in our tracks. There was the Jewish woman who, as a child in the 1930s, lived next door to Hitler (yes, really). There was the woman who worked with the code breakers at Bletchley Park during the Second World War and didn’t tell a soul — including close family — for 50 years. Then there was Wolodymyr Papuca, born in Ukraine in 1925, a few years before Stalin’s Terror-Famine — or Holodomor — brought death to up to 10 million Ukrainians. It’s an extraordinary tale of survival — against all the odds. You can read an extract of Wally’s memoir below:

Comment